How to Improvise a Panettone Tin

How to Improvise a Panettone Tin

Yep, panettone’s mar­vel­lous. Unfor­tu­nately — just like most things — it’s not at its best in long-life, vac-packed, slightly stale long-life form. If you’re recoil­ing in hor­ror at hear­ing that, read on.

Mak­ing the stuff — as I’m about to explain in lots of detail — requires noth­ing that super­mar­kets don’t sell and will cost less than buy­ing it, will taste bet­ter and will make a proper present. The prob­lem? They’re a stu­pid shape. Who keeps a cake tin that’s six inches in dia­meter and near enough fif­teen tall? No one sain.

How to Improvise a Panettone Tin

You could make it in a nor­mal cake tin, but that’s a bit of a com­prom­ise. What you need to do is find some­thing — nay, any­thing — that’s metal, round and about six inches wide. I found an alu­minium milk pan. Oth­ers use cut­lery drain­ers, cof­fee tins or just clever arrange­ments of paper and string. I’m not clever, get cof­fee in bags and, as far as I know, our cut­lery drains itself.

How to Improvise a Panettone Tin

So, start with your round con­tainer. Don’t auto­mat­ic­ally write off sauce­pans with plastic handles, by the way — many of them look placky but are actu­ally heat res­ist­ant to some degree. Obvi­ously, don’t try any­thing silly without check­ing with the man­u­fac­turer first… (etc, sorry for the self-interested back-covering babble).

Inside this tin/pan you’re going to need an office stapler and some greaseproof paper. If you’ve got thicker brown pack­ing paper, that’ll help too. Begin by cut­ting about 25 inches (65cm) of brown or greaseproof paper. Fold it in half, along the long edge, then fold over the long, loose edges by about a cen­ti­metre to bind them together. Roll this around a rolling pin to make it easier to fit to the pan. Feed one end of this strip inside the other, so that you get a big cyl­in­der whose size you can change pretty easily.

Put it into your tin and adjust it so that it fits, then take it out and staple it in pos­i­tion — once at the top and once at the bot­tom. Return the paper to the tin then cut a 20 inch (50 cm) length of greaseproof paper. Use this to line the paper col­lar as you would a nor­mal cake tin, fold­ing the bot­tom edge in to give it a base and fold­ing the top over to give it the right height. Staple this in place. Fin­ish with a circle of greaseproof paper at the bottom.

And there you have it. Proof the dough, and through it the oven — just don’t go too hot or you’re paper will start to smoulder. (Below 180°C or 355°F shouldn’t present any issues.)

How to Improvise a Panettone Tin

2 thoughts on “How to Improvise a Panettone Tin

    • Very, very good point. In my exper­i­ence, even a fairly light seem­ing sauce­pan will inhibit the cook­ing of the half of the pan­ettone that remains within it. As long as your paper innards are sturdy enough, a pretty decent solu­tion would cer­tainly be to remove it from the pan after half an hour of cook­ing and then giv­ing it another 1020 mins.

      Good luck.

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